Presentation Title

Imagining Others

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Start Date

30-4-2021 12:00 AM

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Department

Psychology

Faculty Mentor

Elizbeth Parks-Stamm, Bruce Thompson

Keywords

developmental psychology, warmth and competence

Abstract

In a previous study (Parks-Stamm, Henson, & Martiny, 2020), upper elementary school-aged girls were surveyed about their mothers’ warmth, competence, and agency at home and how they imagine their mothers at work. Mothers’ warmth at home was positively correlated with perceived competence and agency both at home and at work. Past literature suggested that adults’ perceptions of warmth and competence are negatively correlated, with homemakers being perceived as warm but not competent, and female professionals being perceived as competent but not warm (Cuddy et al., 2004). Therefore, there appears to be a difference in how children use warmth and competence as opposed to adults, at least when they are describing their own mothers.

This study expands upon the prior study, instead utilizing college-aged students (anyone of US nationality, enrolled at a college institution, in the age range of 18-23). The study aims to determine whether young adults, like younger children, report a similar positive correlation between warmth and competence in rating their own mothers, examines how they evaluate other unknown female targets, and also expands upon the demographic by including both males and females.

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Apr 30th, 12:00 AM

Imagining Others

In a previous study (Parks-Stamm, Henson, & Martiny, 2020), upper elementary school-aged girls were surveyed about their mothers’ warmth, competence, and agency at home and how they imagine their mothers at work. Mothers’ warmth at home was positively correlated with perceived competence and agency both at home and at work. Past literature suggested that adults’ perceptions of warmth and competence are negatively correlated, with homemakers being perceived as warm but not competent, and female professionals being perceived as competent but not warm (Cuddy et al., 2004). Therefore, there appears to be a difference in how children use warmth and competence as opposed to adults, at least when they are describing their own mothers.

This study expands upon the prior study, instead utilizing college-aged students (anyone of US nationality, enrolled at a college institution, in the age range of 18-23). The study aims to determine whether young adults, like younger children, report a similar positive correlation between warmth and competence in rating their own mothers, examines how they evaluate other unknown female targets, and also expands upon the demographic by including both males and females.

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