Start Date

8-5-2020 12:00 AM

Document Type

Poster Session

Department

Engineering

Advisor

Carlos Lück, PhD

Abstract

The standard for modern power system designs involves multiple generators operating in parallel to share a common load. This configuration has numerous advantages, including improved system redundancy and adaptability. For a generator to be inserted into an existing electrical network, a set of criteria must be met with regards to the generator voltage, phase angle, phase sequence, and frequency relative to that of the network. A device capable of measuring all of these quantities simultaneously is necessary for the synchronization to take place. This capstone project will investigate the topic of generator paralleling by addressing the design and implementation of a three phase paralleling unit. The device will be used to integrate an experimental generator to the grid, and data will be collected regarding the power flow characteristics of the paralleled system. It will be demonstrated that the real and reactive power contributions from the generator can be controlled when operating in this configuration, indicating that parallel generators can be used for power factor correction purposes. The completed product will be used as a learning tool for future power systems classes at the University of Southern Maine.

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May 8th, 12:00 AM

Paralleling Generators: Synchronization Design & Power Flow Analysis

The standard for modern power system designs involves multiple generators operating in parallel to share a common load. This configuration has numerous advantages, including improved system redundancy and adaptability. For a generator to be inserted into an existing electrical network, a set of criteria must be met with regards to the generator voltage, phase angle, phase sequence, and frequency relative to that of the network. A device capable of measuring all of these quantities simultaneously is necessary for the synchronization to take place. This capstone project will investigate the topic of generator paralleling by addressing the design and implementation of a three phase paralleling unit. The device will be used to integrate an experimental generator to the grid, and data will be collected regarding the power flow characteristics of the paralleled system. It will be demonstrated that the real and reactive power contributions from the generator can be controlled when operating in this configuration, indicating that parallel generators can be used for power factor correction purposes. The completed product will be used as a learning tool for future power systems classes at the University of Southern Maine.

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