Start Date

4-2021 12:00 AM

Document Type

Poster Session

Department

Nursing

Faculty Mentor

Dr. Linda Samia, PhD, RN, CNL

Keywords

group prenatal care, CenteringPregnancy, women of color, racial health disparities

Abstract

Women of color in the United States experience disproportionately higher rates of adverse pregnancy-related outcomes, both in the prenatal and postpartum period. Group prenatal care (GPC) has been gaining popularity in recent years and has demonstrated improved health outcomes. The aim of this systematic literature review was to examine and summarize the impact of group prenatal care on health outcomes for women of color in the United States. Using a systematic approach and PRISMA guidelines, two electronic databases—CINAHL and PubMed—were used to search the literature. Quantitative research studies that were published in peer-reviewed journals between 2010 and 2020, written in the English language, and examined health outcomes for women of color in the United States were screened for inclusion. Study strength and quality were assessed, and 10 studies (nine retrospective cohort studies/medical chart reviews and one meta-analysis) were systematically reviewed. Overall, published studies support efficacy of group prenatal care in improving health outcomes for pregnant women of color. Rates of preterm birth and low birth weight were decreased, and breastfeeding initiation and continuation were increased. Group prenatal care is an effective intervention for improving health outcomes for women of color. To close the racial gap in infant and maternal mortality, more high-quality research examining specific outcomes for women of color, particularly Black women, participating in group prenatal care is needed.

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Apr 30th, 12:00 AM

Impact of Group Prenatal Care on Health Outcomes for Women of Color in the United States: A Systematic Literature Review

Women of color in the United States experience disproportionately higher rates of adverse pregnancy-related outcomes, both in the prenatal and postpartum period. Group prenatal care (GPC) has been gaining popularity in recent years and has demonstrated improved health outcomes. The aim of this systematic literature review was to examine and summarize the impact of group prenatal care on health outcomes for women of color in the United States. Using a systematic approach and PRISMA guidelines, two electronic databases—CINAHL and PubMed—were used to search the literature. Quantitative research studies that were published in peer-reviewed journals between 2010 and 2020, written in the English language, and examined health outcomes for women of color in the United States were screened for inclusion. Study strength and quality were assessed, and 10 studies (nine retrospective cohort studies/medical chart reviews and one meta-analysis) were systematically reviewed. Overall, published studies support efficacy of group prenatal care in improving health outcomes for pregnant women of color. Rates of preterm birth and low birth weight were decreased, and breastfeeding initiation and continuation were increased. Group prenatal care is an effective intervention for improving health outcomes for women of color. To close the racial gap in infant and maternal mortality, more high-quality research examining specific outcomes for women of color, particularly Black women, participating in group prenatal care is needed.

 

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