Start Date

April 2021

Document Type

Poster Session

Department

Biological Sciences

Faculty Mentor

Rachel Cray, MS

Keywords

Human Microbiome, Antibiotic Resistance

Abstract

With skin being the largest organ of the human body, there is a very large surface area for a microbiome to form and live. The human microbiome is composed of different types of bacteria, fungi, and archaea, in different locations of the body. This layer can be greatly affected by daily practices including, hygiene habits, exercise, and antibiotic uses. The major objective of this study is to identify species of the human microbiome from various body sites and test their resistance to major chemicals. To achieve this objective, the mouth, ear, axillary area, hand, belly button, and foot of several individuals will be swabbed, and the resulting microbial growth will be tested for resistance against several antibiotics and household chemicals. The results of this study will help with the understanding of antibiotic resistance and other mechanisms for resistance across the human body. These results could also help in the future by preventing the spread of disease and potentially preventing further antibiotic resistance.

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Apr 30th, 12:00 AM

Effects on the Human Microbiome: Antibiotics and other Chemicals

With skin being the largest organ of the human body, there is a very large surface area for a microbiome to form and live. The human microbiome is composed of different types of bacteria, fungi, and archaea, in different locations of the body. This layer can be greatly affected by daily practices including, hygiene habits, exercise, and antibiotic uses. The major objective of this study is to identify species of the human microbiome from various body sites and test their resistance to major chemicals. To achieve this objective, the mouth, ear, axillary area, hand, belly button, and foot of several individuals will be swabbed, and the resulting microbial growth will be tested for resistance against several antibiotics and household chemicals. The results of this study will help with the understanding of antibiotic resistance and other mechanisms for resistance across the human body. These results could also help in the future by preventing the spread of disease and potentially preventing further antibiotic resistance.

 

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