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Start Date

30-4-2021 12:00 AM

Document Type

Oral Presentation

Department

Leadership and Organizational Studies

Faculty Mentor

Elizabeth Goryunova, PhD

Keywords

grit, academic probation, 8-Item Grit Scale, grade point average (GPA)

Abstract

This study explored a personality trait called Grit, which when possessed has shown to improve academic and personal success (Duckworth, Peterson, Matthews, & Kelly, 2007). Grit refers to the ability to persist in the face of struggle. Grit highlights two components; the perseverance of effort toward and sustained interest in a long-term goal (Duckworth, 2013). The objective of this exploratory quantitative study was to investigate the relationship between grit and academic improvement in college students on academic probation (GPA < 2.0 on 4.0 scale).

Two research questions were examined; 1) What is the relationship between grit and academic improvement in college students on academic probation? And 2) Is there a difference in the subscales of grit (effort and interest) and their relationship to academic improvement in college students on academic probation? The hypotheses were that students with higher levels of grit would improve their academic performance measured by a higher GPA than those with low levels of grit, and based on the research, the dimension perseverance of effort would show more significant correlation to higher GPA's than the dimension consistency of interest.

This study investigated 30 college students on academic probation for the spring 2020 semester through the fall 2020 semester and their academic improvement related to their level of grit measured by the 8-Item Grit Scale. Correlation analysis and linear regression using IBM SPSS statistical software were methods employed to explore the relationships.

Finding from this study suggest higher levels of grit predict academic improvement based on GPA’s. The subscale of grit measuring consistency of interest correlated with greater academic improvement. The subscale of perseverance of effort showed no significant correlation with academic improvement. College educators, and academic advisors, will benefit from understanding the aspects of grit and its impact on academic success.

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The Relationship of Grit to Academic Improvement of College Students on Academic Probation - transcript

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Apr 30th, 12:00 AM

The Relationship of Grit to Academic Improvement of College Students on Academic Probation

This study explored a personality trait called Grit, which when possessed has shown to improve academic and personal success (Duckworth, Peterson, Matthews, & Kelly, 2007). Grit refers to the ability to persist in the face of struggle. Grit highlights two components; the perseverance of effort toward and sustained interest in a long-term goal (Duckworth, 2013). The objective of this exploratory quantitative study was to investigate the relationship between grit and academic improvement in college students on academic probation (GPA < 2.0 on 4.0 scale).

Two research questions were examined; 1) What is the relationship between grit and academic improvement in college students on academic probation? And 2) Is there a difference in the subscales of grit (effort and interest) and their relationship to academic improvement in college students on academic probation? The hypotheses were that students with higher levels of grit would improve their academic performance measured by a higher GPA than those with low levels of grit, and based on the research, the dimension perseverance of effort would show more significant correlation to higher GPA's than the dimension consistency of interest.

This study investigated 30 college students on academic probation for the spring 2020 semester through the fall 2020 semester and their academic improvement related to their level of grit measured by the 8-Item Grit Scale. Correlation analysis and linear regression using IBM SPSS statistical software were methods employed to explore the relationships.

Finding from this study suggest higher levels of grit predict academic improvement based on GPA’s. The subscale of grit measuring consistency of interest correlated with greater academic improvement. The subscale of perseverance of effort showed no significant correlation with academic improvement. College educators, and academic advisors, will benefit from understanding the aspects of grit and its impact on academic success.

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