Start Date

8-5-2020 12:00 AM

Document Type

Poster Session

Department

Southern Maine Community College

Faculty Mentor

Daniel Moore, PhD

Abstract

Clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR) was discovered in 1987, this gave us an ability to affordably modify genetic material within a genome. Previously, CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) cut both DNA strands at a specific location determined by a guide RNA. The strands will repair the break with two main mechanisms homology-directed repair (HDR) and nonhomologous repair (Fig 1.). Unfortunately, introducing a designed sequence is not easy. This review describes two new applications of CRISPR as a technology. A new technique was introduced last year called CRISPR Prime Editing. Another recent application of CRISPR is gene drives. With help from CRISPR prime, an allele can be designed to become homozygous by homologous recombination as gametes form so that the designed allele will nearly always be passed to progeny. It may be possible to accurately identify and correct genetic defects in a population. These new technologies create incredible possibilities, as well they also raise major ethical questions.

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May 8th, 12:00 AM

How CRISPR Prime Edited Gene Drives could lead to a Genetic Revolution

Clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR) was discovered in 1987, this gave us an ability to affordably modify genetic material within a genome. Previously, CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) cut both DNA strands at a specific location determined by a guide RNA. The strands will repair the break with two main mechanisms homology-directed repair (HDR) and nonhomologous repair (Fig 1.). Unfortunately, introducing a designed sequence is not easy. This review describes two new applications of CRISPR as a technology. A new technique was introduced last year called CRISPR Prime Editing. Another recent application of CRISPR is gene drives. With help from CRISPR prime, an allele can be designed to become homozygous by homologous recombination as gametes form so that the designed allele will nearly always be passed to progeny. It may be possible to accurately identify and correct genetic defects in a population. These new technologies create incredible possibilities, as well they also raise major ethical questions.

 

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