Start Date

8-5-2020 12:00 AM

Document Type

Poster Session

Department

Engineering

Faculty Mentor

Asheesh Lanba, PhD

Abstract

Laser ablation tomography (LATscan) is a new 3D structural analysis technique that provides researchers with data they did not have access to before. LATscan is a faster, higher resolution, material agnostic method that promises to fundamentally improve specimen analysis from medical research to agrochemical research. The technology uses an ultraviolet (UV) pulsed laser is used to continually ablate thin layers of samples while simultaneously imaging them. These images perfectly capture the cross-sections in their natural state prior to ablation. The color resulting from UV-induced fluorescence in the images allows for easy image segmentation to identify microscale anatomical and compositional features, and thus samples do not need staining. The images are then stacked to produce 3D models for volumetric microanalysis. The image resolution of the sections is comparable to optical microscopy modalities, and the distance between slices is only limited by the resolution of the stage feeding the sample into the laser ablation plane. This poster explains the technology, and presents results from a use-case study on soybean stems. Quantifying vascular features in soybean stems will allow researchers to better understand the relationship between genetics and drought-resilient crop. This understanding will result in water-efficient soybean crops that can grow in diverse environments.

Open Access?

1

Share

COinS
 
May 8th, 12:00 AM

Laser Ablation Tomography (LATscan): Enabling Natural Color 3D Microanalysis of Biological Systems

Laser ablation tomography (LATscan) is a new 3D structural analysis technique that provides researchers with data they did not have access to before. LATscan is a faster, higher resolution, material agnostic method that promises to fundamentally improve specimen analysis from medical research to agrochemical research. The technology uses an ultraviolet (UV) pulsed laser is used to continually ablate thin layers of samples while simultaneously imaging them. These images perfectly capture the cross-sections in their natural state prior to ablation. The color resulting from UV-induced fluorescence in the images allows for easy image segmentation to identify microscale anatomical and compositional features, and thus samples do not need staining. The images are then stacked to produce 3D models for volumetric microanalysis. The image resolution of the sections is comparable to optical microscopy modalities, and the distance between slices is only limited by the resolution of the stage feeding the sample into the laser ablation plane. This poster explains the technology, and presents results from a use-case study on soybean stems. Quantifying vascular features in soybean stems will allow researchers to better understand the relationship between genetics and drought-resilient crop. This understanding will result in water-efficient soybean crops that can grow in diverse environments.

 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.

 
blog comments powered by Disqus