Start Date

8-5-2020 12:00 AM

Document Type

Poster Session

Department

Environmental Science and Policy

Advisor

Joseph K. Staples, PhD

Abstract

Invasive species threaten many aspects of ecological stability. Although it is commonly assumed that earthworms are beneficial to plants, this is not always the case. Some species of earthworms, in particular members belonging to the genera Amynthas, are more impactful than others. In this research, we examine the effect that earthworms have on winter wheat (Triticum aestivum), by measuring germination, survivorship, and morphological features in plants exposed to earthworms versus worm-free control soils. We further examine physiochemical changes in soils including pH level, elemental composition, and water content to better understand how earthworms are changing the environment under controlled conditions.

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May 8th, 12:00 AM

Impact of Earthworms on Plant Development, Soil Properties, and Root Response

Invasive species threaten many aspects of ecological stability. Although it is commonly assumed that earthworms are beneficial to plants, this is not always the case. Some species of earthworms, in particular members belonging to the genera Amynthas, are more impactful than others. In this research, we examine the effect that earthworms have on winter wheat (Triticum aestivum), by measuring germination, survivorship, and morphological features in plants exposed to earthworms versus worm-free control soils. We further examine physiochemical changes in soils including pH level, elemental composition, and water content to better understand how earthworms are changing the environment under controlled conditions.

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