Start Date

8-5-2020 12:00 AM

Document Type

Poster Session

Department

Nursing

Advisor

Carol Fackler, DNSc, RN

Abstract

Anxiety is a common mental health concern amongst young adults and adolescents, which may consequently lead to social and cognitive barriers. A limited number of studies have looked at the possible relationship between youth's social media use and anxiety. The purpose of this systematic literature review is to identify, review, synthesize, and analyze current evidence on the relationship between adolescent and young adult use of social media and anxiety. A systematic search was conducted using the following database: PsychINFO. After review of abstracts, full texts, and application of inclusion and exclusion criteria 7 studies remained. A descendant search yielded one study resulting in a final sample of 8 quantitative, non-experimental, primary research studies. Three studies showed a relationship between time spent on social media and anxiety, suggesting that time spent on social media may be linked to anxiety. Two studies failed to find a significant relationship between types of social media and anxiety, maybe further supporting time as a key factor in the development of anxiety. Future research is needed to determine if anxiety leads to more frequent social media use, or if increased use leads to anxiety. Additional data may aid in the creation of policies that guide standards of care, such as screening instruments and use recommendations. These standards could be used by nurses to assess for social media related anxiety and reduce social media use.

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May 8th, 12:00 AM

The Use of Social Media by Young Adults and Adolescents in Relationship to Anxiety: A Systematic Literature Review

Anxiety is a common mental health concern amongst young adults and adolescents, which may consequently lead to social and cognitive barriers. A limited number of studies have looked at the possible relationship between youth's social media use and anxiety. The purpose of this systematic literature review is to identify, review, synthesize, and analyze current evidence on the relationship between adolescent and young adult use of social media and anxiety. A systematic search was conducted using the following database: PsychINFO. After review of abstracts, full texts, and application of inclusion and exclusion criteria 7 studies remained. A descendant search yielded one study resulting in a final sample of 8 quantitative, non-experimental, primary research studies. Three studies showed a relationship between time spent on social media and anxiety, suggesting that time spent on social media may be linked to anxiety. Two studies failed to find a significant relationship between types of social media and anxiety, maybe further supporting time as a key factor in the development of anxiety. Future research is needed to determine if anxiety leads to more frequent social media use, or if increased use leads to anxiety. Additional data may aid in the creation of policies that guide standards of care, such as screening instruments and use recommendations. These standards could be used by nurses to assess for social media related anxiety and reduce social media use.

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