Document Type

Policy Brief

Publication Date

6-1-2015

Keywords

Cutler, Population Health and Health Policy

Abstract

In 2001, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) identified patient centeredness as one of six essential aims of “a new health care system for the 21st century”.1 Since that time, we have begun a gradual shift from a professionally driven system toward one that is more “patient centered” or “consumer centered,” recognizing and incorporating patients’ perspectives in decisions in clinical care, delivery system, and policies. As the health care system responds to new payment approaches and positions itself to achieve the Triple Aim (i.e. better care, lower cost, enhanced patient experience), it is important to assess how organizations that are moving to advance health care service delivery and payment reform are integrating patient engagement into the health system transformation process.

Since 2011, the Maine Health Access Foundation’s Advancing Payment Reform initiative has funded 13 health system transformation projects. Diverse in their approach, each has undertaken efforts to achieve greater patient engagement ranging from involving patients and families as informed and active participants in their own health care (e.g. shared decision making, self-management) to involving patients at the organizational or policy-level through consumer advisory boards and other means to provide guidance for health system transformation.

This brief summarizes the experience of these grantees in developing and implementing strategies to engage patients in payment reform and delivery system redesign.2 The purpose is to identify common themes and lessons within and across these initiatives to inform future patient engagement efforts.

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